linkmachinego.com

November 7, 2014
[wikipedia] First Drafts of History … a tumblr looking at the first draft of Wikipedia articles … The first draft of the iPhone: ‘The iPhone is born from Apple and Motorola’s Alliance. He’s simply a white Motorola E398, like Cupertino’s iPod, with a embedded version of iTunes Music Store. The iPhone has 555 mb free storage, and can transfer one hundred of AAC music files (used by the iTunes Music Store). iPhone’s interest is the price of one music on the iTunes Music Store : 0.99€, when a lot of operators is selling 2€ or 3€ one music. We may be see a opening of the music sell for the mobile in a few month. The iPhone may be come on the market July, 7, 2005, because Apple had convened all the press this day. Note of author : please rewritting my article in a correct english. thank you’
April 15, 2014
[wikipedia] TL;DR Wikipedia … condensed Wikipedia … ‘Ayn Rand was American novelist, best known for developing the philosophy of Objectivism, which apparently states that every college freshmen must get really into Objectivism.’ [via Qwghlm]
January 29, 2014
[wikipedia] 12 Spectacular Acts Of Wikipedia Vandalism … More from Buzzfeed but the vandalism of Spot the Dog’s wikipedia entry is worth a look … ‘Where’s Spot? Is he under the stairs? Is he in the box? No. He’s at the bar: Sipping whiskey. Sucking on cigarettes. Suffering.’
August 27, 2013
[wikipedia] Updating a Printed Wikipedia … How many printers would you need to print out the English version of Wikipedia? … ‘Six printers isn’t that many, but they’d be running all the time. And that gets expensive. The electricity to run them would be cheap—a few dollars a day. The paper would be about one cent per sheet, which means you’ll be spending about a thousand dollars a day. You’d want to hire people to manage the printers 24/7, but that would actually cost less than the paper. Even the printers themselves wouldn’t be too expensive, despite the terrifying replacement cycle. But the ink cartridges would be a nightmare.’
August 8, 2013
[wikipedia] Wikipedia:Terminal Event Management Policy … Wikipedia’s amusing protocol for saving the encyclopedia’s data in the event of an apocalypse … ‘Following the implementation of the level 2 warning, editors are expected to commence the transfer of the encyclopedia to other media. As an immediate measure, it is suggested that editors print as many articles as possible, with due regard to any personal safety concerns that may be faced in these extraordinary events.’
May 28, 2013
[wikipedia] Revenge, ego and the corruption of Wikipedia … a fascinating look at the detection of a rogue Wikipedia editor … ‘Some parts of the exchange struck me as odd, particularly his declaration that he was was “tech-deficient.” Young has over 5,000 friends on Facebook, a Twitter account, a resume that includes a stint teaching at the online-only University of Phoenix and a credit on his eldercare website that says “Designed by Robert Young © 2012 using Homestead website templates.” He sounded right at home in the realm of new technology.’
February 5, 2013
[death] Wikipedia’s list of unusual deaths‘1959: In the Dyatlov Pass incident, nine ski hikers in the Ural Mountains abandoned their camp in the middle of the night, some clad only in their underwear despite sub-zero weather. Six died of hypothermia and three by unexplained injuries. The corpses showed no signs of struggle, but one had a fatal skull fracture, two had major chest fractures, and one was missing her tongue. Soviet investigators determined only that “a compelling unknown force” had caused the deaths. During the hikers’ memorials, several witnesses reported that the bodies had an “orangish tint” to them.’
August 18, 2011
[life] Tetrapharmakos … Epicurus’ four-part cure for leading a happy life …

“The fundamental obstacle to happiness, says Epicurus, is anxiety,” writes D. S. Hutchinson.

December 14, 2009
[funny] I Am Locking the Wikipedia Article On Our Sex Life‘Locking the article has also become necessary to prevent the constant reinsertion of a section with the heading “Like a Cowardly Slug That’s Just Spotted a Pile of Salt,” detailing at length the uncharacteristically unsatisfying night we shared in a Paris hotel last summer. As I made clear several times on the talk page of our sex life, that was a completely unrepresentative occasion…’
December 4, 2009
[interesting] The 50 Most Interesting Articles On Wikipedia … including… ETAOIN SHRDLU: ‘The letters on Linotype keyboards were arranged by letter frequency, so ETAOIN SHRDLU were the first two vertical columns on the left side of the keyboard.’
March 2, 2008
[wikipedia] Nicholson Baker on The Charms of Wikipedia‘Without the kooks and the insulters and the spray-can taggers, Wikipedia would just be the most useful encyclopedia ever made. Instead it’s a fast-paced game of paintball. Not only does Wikipedia need its vandals—up to a point—the vandals need an orderly Wikipedia, too. Without order, their culture-jamming lacks a context.’ [via Metafilter]
September 29, 2007
[wikipedia] The 8 Most Needlessly Detailed Wikipedia Entries … On the Wikipedia entry for the Universe of the Metroid Series: ‘…if you searched for “Metroid” because you needed some codes or hints, anything that might make playing the game a little easier, this is not the place to go, unless Metroid 2 has a level where an in-depth understanding of the Space Pirate’s culture and physiology comes in handy. Word Count: 30,106. That’s more words than Shakespeare’s fifth longest play, Henry IV, Part 2.’
September 12, 2007
[wikipedia] My Wikipedia Contrail: Tox‘Tox is a prolific and widely known graffiti tagger on the London Underground, active since 2000. His simple tags TOX 02, TOX 03, TOX 04 etc., in the style of TAKI 183, can be seen many hundreds of times across above-ground sections of the network in Central London, particularly the Metropolitan Line.’
September 2, 2007
[wikipedia] Wikirage‘This site lists the pages in Wikipedia which are receiving the most edits per unique editor over various periods of time. Popular people in the news, the latest fads, and the hottest video games can be quickly identified by monitor this social phenomenon.’ [via Daring Fireball]
August 29, 2007
[funny] What Wikipedia would look like if on paper, broken down — interesting analysis from Qwghlm‘Libel’
June 22, 2007
[wikipedia] Wikington Crescent … How to Play: ‘To start a game of Wikington Crescent, first click on the Random article link. From the article given, you then click on one of the article links to the next article. The object of the game is to reach the article on Mornington Crescent tube station, whilst clicking on as few articles as possible. The fewer the links used, the better the game. An example is that the article for Matterhorn can lead you to Mornington Crescent tube station within four links.’ [via plep]
March 9, 2007
[wikipedia] Top 100 most-viewed pages on Wikipedia [via Waxy]
February 9, 2007
[wikipedia] Anna Nicole Smith’s death sends Wikipedia into overdrive‘I get all my news from a large online forum… Whenever they say someone’s dead, I rush to Wikipedia to edit their article… But I’ve always been too late. Why is it that scientific news takes so long to be made public, but when somebody dies everyone flocks to it? We’re all just a bunch of necrophiles, aren’t we?’ [via linkbunnies.org]
December 17, 2006
[wikipedia] My Wikipedia Contrail: Larry David‘Curb Your Enthusiasm was credited with helping clear a Los Angeles man named Juan Catalan of a first-degree murder charge. Catalan, who was arrested on suspicion of murder, maintained his innocence, saying he was at a Los Angeles Dodgers baseball game on May 12, 2003, during the time of the slaying. During the game, an episode of Curb Your Enthusiasm was being shot in Dodger Stadium which contained footage of Juan Catalan with his daughter. When told that his show had released a wrongfully accused man, Larry David commented in a New Yorker article, “I tell people that I’ve now done one decent thing in my life. Albeit inadvertently.”’
November 13, 2006
[wikipedia] My Wikipedia Contrail: Russell’s Teapot … Bertrand Russell: ‘If I were to suggest that between the Earth and Mars there is a china teapot revolving about the sun in an elliptical orbit, nobody would be able to disprove my assertion provided I were careful to add that the teapot is too small to be revealed even by our most powerful telescopes. But if I were to go on to say that, since my assertion cannot be disproved, it is intolerable presumption on the part of human reason to doubt it, I should rightly be thought to be talking nonsense. If, however, the existence of such a teapot were affirmed in ancient books, taught as the sacred truth every Sunday, and instilled into the minds of children at school, hesitation to believe in its existence would become a mark of eccentricity and entitle the doubter to the attentions of the psychiatrist in an enlightened age or of the Inquisitor in an earlier time.’
November 5, 2006
[wikipedia] My Wikipedia Contrail: Peter Falk‘Falk wears an ocular prosthetic (“glass eye”). His right eye was surgically removed at the age of three because of cancer.’
November 3, 2006
[wikipedia] Wikipedia’s Lamest Edit WarsAvengers (Comics) vs. New Avengers (Comics): ‘Should there be a separate page for New Avengers (comics)? Is the name of the team now the New Avengers or is it just a new Avengers? Is it a new comic entirely or just a continuation of the old one? Following a positive merge vote, a series of reverts occurs when an editor “merges” the two by simply pasting the merged information into the article, creating two articles in one. The slow nature of the revert war means that, technically, nobody violates WP:3RR, and requests for help from other admins go unheeded because, well, it’s lame. After a series of exchanges on the talk page questioning people’s command of English as well as their sanity, the issue appears to have been settled with the creation of New Avengers (comic book) (note the oh-so-subtle distinction)…’ [thanks Alisterb]
September 14, 2006
[wikipedia] The Stormtrooper Effect‘The name originated with the armed Imperial Stormtroopers in the original Star Wars trilogy, who, despite their considerable advantages of close range, overwhelming numbers, professional military training, full armor, military-grade firepower, and noticeable combat effectiveness against non-speaking characters, were incapable of seriously harming the protagonists.’
August 1, 2006
[wiki] My Wikipedia Contrail: Fallen Astronaut‘Fallen Astronaut is an 8.5-cm (slightly over 3″) aluminum sculpture of an astronaut in a spacesuit. It is the only piece of art on the Moon.’
July 5, 2006
[wikipedia] My Wikipedia Contrail: Kipple‘Kipple is a term coined by science fiction author Philip K. Dick in the book Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?. It refers to unwanted or useless junk that tends to reproduce itself. Some of Dick’s descriptions of it suggest an analogy to entropy. According to two characters from the book, John Isidore stated that the first law of “kipple” is that “kipple” drives out “nonkipple”;’
July 2, 2006
[wikipedia] My Wikipedia Contrail: Richard Belzer — random cast look-up during Law & Order: Special Victims Unit‘Belzer and Henry Winkler (most notably the Fonz on Happy Days) are cousins.’
June 29, 2006
[wikipedia] My Wikipedia Contrail: Seinfeld … Jason Alexander on George: ‘…the true root of [George’s] character was realized upon a conversation between Alexander and David earlier on in the series, in which Alexander questions a script saying, “This could never happen to anyone and even if it did, no human being would react like this” to which David replied, “What do you mean? This happened to me once and this is exactly how I reacted!”‘
[wikipedia] My Wikipedia Contrail: No True Scotsman. ‘…a common fallacy in politics, in which critics may condemn their colleagues as not being “true” liberals or conservatives because they occasionally disagree on certain matters of policy. It comes in many other forms – “No decent person would” – it is argued “support hanging/watch pornography/smoke in public”, etc. Often the speaker seems unaware that he/she is, in fact, coercively (re)defining what the phrase “decent person” means to include/exclude what he/she wants and NOT simply following what the phrase is already accepted as meaning.’
June 28, 2006
[wikipedia] My Wikipedia Contrail: Alfred Henry Hook — I took a look at this because I wondered what happed to Hooky from Zulu after the Battle of Rourke’s Drift … ‘In the film Zulu, Hook is portrayed as an insubordinate malingerer and drunkard who only comes good during the battle. In fact he had been awarded Good Conduct pay shortly prior to the battle, and reports also suggest he was a teetotaller.’
[wikipedia] My Wikipedia Contrail: Evel Knievel‘On the morning of the jump, Knievel stopped in the casino and placed a single $100 dollar bet on the blackjack table, which he lost, stopped by the bar and got a shot of Wild Turkey and then headed outside where he was joined by several members of the Caesar’s staff, as well as two scantily clad showgirls. After doing his normal pre-jump show and a few warm up approaches, Knievel began his real approach. When he hit the takeoff ramp, he felt the motorcycle unexpectedly decelerate. The sudden loss of power on the takeoff caused Knievel to come up short and land on the safety ramp which was supported by a van. This caused the handlebars to be ripped out of his hands as he tumbled over them onto the pavement where he skidded into the Dunes parking lot. As a result of the crash, Knievel received a crushed pelvis and femur, fractures to his hip, wrist and both ankles and a concussion that kept him in a coma for 29 days.’
June 19, 2006
[wikipedia] Un_Wikiwatch crap get deleted from Wikipedia in real time … ‘So I’m told that Scotty doesn’t know? Matt Damon sings this song? Octavio has a really hot girlfriend and gets none?’ [via Haddock]
February 7, 2006
[wikipedia] Six degrees of Wikipedia — finds a path between two Wikipedia articles using links in the text.
December 30, 2005
[games] Mornington Crescent on Wikipedia — contains spoilers for the game … ‘Item #101 of the 2005 University of Chicago Scavenger Hunt was for one player on each team to “participate in an email adaptation of the classic game Mornington Crescent”, using the CTA rail system. Participants were warned, “We shall follow the standard Thurgood-Hamilton conversion algorithm, but banning semi-lateral shunts.”‘ [via Metafilter]
September 19, 2005
[comics] BY WIKIPEDIA BETRAYED! John Byrne vs. Wikipedia — Byrne deletes most of the content from his entry in Wikipedia. Hi-jinks ensue‘Byrne discovered [his Wikipedia Entry] the other week and immediately set about to “correct” things. Here’s the problem. Byrne didn’t just want to go through to clarify points or streamline the entry – he wanted to dismantle the entire page. He deleted everything except for the opening biographical paragraph and the bibliography. He deleted every bit of information regarding his career stages, his interactions with fans, pros, etc., claiming that the entire entry was fraught with inaccuracies and lies. Thing is, they weren’t.’ [via Metafilter]
June 9, 2005
[wikipedia] Wikipedia’s Lamest Edit Wars EverWhat would Jesus do?: ‘Should the article link to Brian Boitano or What Would Brian Boitano Do? Should a movie title be italicized? Did something happen in the middle of the 1990’s or the mid-to late-1990’s? These and other probing questions were at the heart of five-day long edit war between Anthony and Wik, during which the page had to be protected twice. The campaign spread to other pages…’ [via Yoz]
May 4, 2005
[wikipedia] Random Entry at Wikipedia — link to a Random Entry on Wikipedia.
January 24, 2005
[wikipedia] Unusual articles in Wikipedia‘This page is for Wikipedians to list articles that seem a bit unusual. These articles are valuable contributions to the encyclopedia, but are somewhat odd, whimsical, or… well, something you wouldn’t expect to find in Encyclopedia Britannica.’
October 27, 2004
[web] Who knows? — Simon Waldman on the rise of Wikipedia‘The current Encyclopedia Britannica has 44m words of text. Wikipedia already has more than 250m words in it. Britannica’s most recent edition has 65,000 entries in print and 75,000 entries online. Wikipedia’s English site has some 360,000 entries and is growing every day. But numbers mean nothing if the quality is no good. And this is where the arguments start…’
December 6, 2002
[web] Wikipedia — a free encylopedia using a WikiWiki. ‘…a collaborative project to produce a free and complete encyclopedia in every language. We started in January 2001 and are already working on 94470 articles in the English version, with more being added and improved all the time. Anyone, including you, can edit any article right now, without even having to log in.’