linkmachinego.com

September 19, 2000
[net] Guardian Unlimited covers the paratrooper who was sacked for looking at too many dull websites. ‘Jim was dismissed by his employers for excessive use of the internet when he was supposed to be working. Our best point is that Jim, unlike I suspect most bored surfers, was not looking at hotchicks.com or pussytown.com or any other sort of porn. Jim was looking at some very dull stuff. I’ve seen the logs. Jim spent over an hour looking at avocado recipes on one occasion. At other times he conducted searches on: his mother’s maiden name, various cricket players [and] verrucas.’
September 5, 2000
[internet] How fast is your internet connection? ’56K modems also require a clean, straight through telephone connection to the telephone company’s central office switching center. Phone company line amplifiers that boost a telephone signal over a long distance, PBX switchboard systems, and other phone equipment alter the phone signal and force 56K modems to fall back to speeds of 33.6Kbps and lower.’ [via Sounding Off Column in Sunday Times]
August 21, 2000
[big brother] Guardian Unlimited covers how Nasty Nick’s departure from Big Brother helped converge TV and the internet. ‘But if the convergence between the internet and TV isn’t to become a collision, these media need to work together. Being big on the internet doesn’t necessarily mean that TV viewing figures will decline. Viral marketing? Bollocks. Call it good old-fashioned word of mouth. Internet page impressions went through the roof and boosted, not hindered, the TV audience that night. If the content is compelling enough and production teams plan well, the internet and TV can feed each other. It is the viewer who wins.’
August 20, 2000
[tech] Danny O’Brien takes a look at the rise and fall of Netscape. ‘At the end of the credits in the original Mozilla was a quote from Sartre’s Being and Nothingness: “All human actions are equivalent … and … all are, in principle, doomed to failure.” Well, maybe. But we have to keep on trying, don’t we?’
August 3, 2000
[web] British ISP’s don’t like heavy surfers reports newsUnlimited. ‘He says one user somehow managed to clock up 29 hours of usage in one day by setting up an ISDN-style connection.”There were also several businesses using the service,” he adds, “and we had made it clear this offer was not for business users.”‘
July 30, 2000
[tech] Danny O’Brien profiles Google — possibly the best web search engine around at the moment. “Google’s secret is in being a plain, almost arid-looking search engine driven by a set of abstruse mathematical principles. Its extra selling point is that it actually works. Indeed, its many fans insist that a Google search is better targeted than any other, its unique text-matching technologies yielding a more selective and relevant set of results than the overwhelming deluge many rivals dump on you. And all in two seconds maximum.”
July 26, 2000
[news of the screws] Metafilter on the Jennicam scandal. ‘Because the World Wide Web is all about two things: horrifyingly stupid psychodrama, and naked chicks.’
July 24, 2000
[domain-name craziness] How Network Solutions, Inc. made me a child pornographer — everybody with a domain name registered should read this. “Even more disturbing, I have no way of knowing if my name has been attached to other sites featuring objectionable material. Indeed, the only reason I learned of the present situation was because a pervert in Germany was so anxious to obtain kiddie porn that he mailed a letter to a complete stranger 5,000 miles away. That’s scary.” [via Flutterby]
July 22, 2000
[news of the screws] The National Post reports on the scandal at Jennicam. ‘But today, far from being a window into the life of an ordinary young woman, JenniCam (six cameras situated around her home) provides a glimpse into a slacker’s nirvana. With seemingly no means of support besides webcam revenue, Jenni, 24, whiles away her days in her spacious well- appointed surroundings playing computer games and, quite frequently, masturbating. Last Saturday morning, visitors to the site had the treat of watching Jenni and Dex make love. Her very public betrayal of her close friend, however, has prompted many formerly devoted viewers to vow never to give her another penny. Courtney, since discharged, remains in shock. In a recent journal posting, she laments: “How am I supposed to compete with ‘Jennicam?’ She’s funny, she’s gorgeous, she’s got better furniture. This really, really sucks.”‘
July 15, 2000
[web] Zdnet on Ego-Surfing. ‘[..]Fouts says ego surfing is about more than the need for recognition. “I don’t have any real desire to be in the public eye,” he says. “It lets me know how accessible I am to the world. It’s nice to know that some random person from my past could find me.”‘
July 9, 2000
[net] Danny O’Brien on mailing lists and trolling. “Our new member says he has friends in high places and we should all tread carefully. He says he’s a journalist, and he’ll be calling the tabloids with stories about the other subscribers. He phones the list organiser and hangs up in midcall. He reports subscribers to their ISP’s abuse desks. He threatens another with a libel case. He hurts, too: one man who used the companionship of the list to help with a deep personal crisis unsubscribes in anger at the abuse the troll is spreading; a teenager gets scared he will call the police. He does a search on another subscriber, finds out he’s gay and hurls abuse at him. “
July 8, 2000
[old school web] I used to visit these two sites frequently way back in the old days of the web. Check out Maggie Donea’s Moments and Justin Hall’s Links from the Underground
July 6, 2000
[bbc] Is the BBC doing to well in New Media? “It is not hard to see why privately funded internet publishers are afraid of the BBC moving into their patch. While the start-ups struggle to raise finance and discover the so-far elusive revenue streams, the BBC has no such concerns. BBC Online’s 32m budget last year came from the licence fee, and the site does not carry advertising or sponsorship.”
July 2, 2000
[web] The Sunday Times goes Around the World in Eighty Clicks
June 30, 2000
[web] Douglas Rushkoff talks about the “social currency” of the media and internet. Social currency is like a good joke. When a bunch of friends sit around and tell jokes, what are they really doing? Entertaining one another? Sure, for a start. But they are also using content – mostly unoriginal content that they’ve heard elsewhere – in order to lubricate a social occasion. And what are most of us doing when we listen to a joke? Trying to memorise it so that we can bring it somewhere else. The joke itself is social currency. Interesting in regards to weblogs — I hope LinkMachineGo provide social currency in the form of interesting/useful links… [via Metafilter]
June 26, 2000
[spam] Spamcop… for when your Inbox is full of weird porn sites, crap share deals and bad philosophy.
June 25, 2000
[web] Danny O’Brien on time wasting and log watching. ‘I look at the parts of my logs that show users who stumble on my site while searching for pornography (it’s amazing what searching for “hot”, “water”, “Japanese” and a couple of other terms can point you towards); and I don’t have the ability to track down their e-mail addresses, but I do wonder whether they know they have a constant audience for their movements online.’
June 22, 2000
[web] newsUnlimited reports on the-bullet.com’s recent problems. “What advice would they give to other dot.coms? Billam says: ‘The main thing is don’t expect too much from other people and expect everything to take twice as long as you planned. Keep a close eye on what everyone is doing, and if you do trustpeople to do things for you, make sure you have got goals, and assess their progress. Also don’t be afraid to question the experts.'”
June 14, 2000
[tech] UK ADSL Guide. [I have a crazy dream — cheap unmetered internet access in my lifetime… ]
June 10, 2000
[web] newsUnlimited reports that Tim Berners-Lee doesn’t like ads on web sites. “Newspapers insert a line saying an ad is an advertisement when it looks confusing. I want to see something similar on a web page. Perhaps the mouse should change shape when it passes over an ad to alert you to the fact.”
June 1, 2000
[internet] BBC News reports BT Internet has been having problems with their email server. [BT Internet are pretty awful compared to Demon or Freeserve, I’ve been having various connection problems since I joined and my flatmate has not been able to download his email for the last couple of days. How do BT manage to reliably run the phone network in the UK?]
May 26, 2000
[dotcom] Scan — impressive e-commerce idea. Basically, bang into your mobile the bar code number of any book or CD you see and send it to Scan as a text message. Within thirty seconds or so you get prices and delivery times from three online retailers back to your mobile and if you are registered you can buy it straight away….
May 24, 2000
[dotcom] Nice inside story/analysis of where boo.com went wrong. [via Metafilter]
[dotcom] newsUnlimited covers how the boo.com staff feel after their redundancy “[..]As for the founders’ alleged profligacy, Thomson is diplomatic. “Getting through 91m in a year is quite lavish,” she says simply.”
May 23, 2000
[weird science] Potato powered webservers… [this one is going to get blogged everywhere]
May 22, 2000
[old school web] Browsing the old bookmarks again… I find The Couch. [Unlike Geek Cereal it’s still online but the last entry was in 1997…] We want love, success and power but our neuroses get in the way.
May 19, 2000
[book] 253 a novel for the Internet about London Underground in seven cars and a crash
[old school net] Whatever happened to Geek Cereal?
May 18, 2000
[dotcom] Slashdot has the answer to why boo.com failed: My wife never heard of boo.com (Score:5, Insightful)
May 14, 2000
[tech] Much of the Internet leads nowhere according to a recent mapping project. “If you picked two random pages and tried to click from one to the other, “there’s a 75 percent chance that you will never get there,” LaMore said. If a path did exist, the average click separation would be 16, the researchers said.” Hmmm… I always said you were never more than four clicks away from porn on the Internet… I guess I was wrong!
May 12, 2000
[tech] Embrace, extend, censor — Microsoft goes after Slashdot. Here’s the original article
May 10, 2000
[film] filmUnlimited on trailers being released on the internet. Mat Snow, former editor of the mature gentleman’s rock monthly Mojo, once explained how he had fully enjoyed Godzilla without ever having seen the film. For the months of build-up beforehand, he had the pleasure of getting excited about the film, imagining the monster and the movie in his head, getting off on the hype. By the time the film actually came out, he had been reliably informed that it stank. So he didn’t go to see it. But he didn’t feel cheated – he had had four months of enjoyable anticipation at no cost.
May 8, 2000
[internet] BBC News looks at real.com’s prospects — competition from Microsoft Napster and Shoutcast seem to be the main problems!
May 7, 2000
[web] I’ve been trying to find the best on-line bookmark manager on the web — blink seems to be the best of the bunch (at least for me).
May 4, 2000
[MP3] The Register points out that the phrase MP3 has been sprayed on statues and walls in Whitehall after the Mayday protest: ‘Quite why these hardened anarchists and eco-twats felt the need to paint a computer format alongside cries for revolution is unclear – is this the first sign of an internet generation, lost and disillusioned and unable to function without a keyboard, crying out for attention? Who cares.’
May 3, 2000
[tech] Slashdot reports that the Internet goes into orbit after a satellite is pinged from earth. 15 minute ping times, sure. But how the fsck will RIAA stop us from downloading MP3s when the servers are located in deep space? :) :) :)
April 30, 2000
[uk internet] BBC News is reporting that T-Online wants to buy Freeserve.
April 28, 2000
[uk] jobsUnlimited reports on the man who got fired for having porn delivered to his workplace the old fashioned way. “The tribunal decides against Steve in a relatively uncensorious fashion. There seems to be a tacit agreement that he has suffered enough. We can all go home and forget about Planet Mammary. Am still puzzled myself about double anal. But please don’t write in to explain.”
April 27, 2000
[tv] FilmFour to broadcast banned sex scenes on web. FilmFour will show a doctored version of The Idiots, which caused controversy when it was given a cinema certificate, on its subscription channel. But it will “webcast” the most controversial scenes, uncut, on its website.
April 20, 2000
[politics] Tory MP admits to surfing for porn: New Forest West’s Desmond Swayne told MPs it was only the Commons division bell that stopped him from lingering with a sense of “fascination” over a porn site.
April 10, 2000
[lastminute] lastminute.com is best known UK travel brand on the Internet according to a new survey.
April 9, 2000
[tech] A UK Archbishop warns that the internet is evil [Low Graphics]. Has he actually used it, I wonder?
April 2, 2000
[internet] newsUnlimited meets the man who sued the world [Text Only]. Very interesting profile of Laurence Godfrey — he sued Demon a UK ISP after it failed to removed some nasty comments about him posted on soc.culture.thai Usenet newsgroup [BBC News Story] .
March 22, 2000
[random] I would have thought that the phrase “The revolution will be netcast!” would be on a lot more sites than it actually is. Interesting…
March 19, 2000
[lastminute] Some fallout from lastminute.com’s recent ipo: BBC News report on delivery times for a bottle of Champagne from Lastminute and here’s a copy of the lastminute FAQ from Motley Fool’s chat forum.
March 17, 2000
[internet] icontown [via The Face magazine — does The Face have a web site?]
March 16, 2000
The Guardian on easyEverything — this article captures the atmosphere pretty well. I’ve been visiting a lot recently — trying to cut those peak-rate phone bills — and it reminds me of the university computer rooms I used to work and study in.
[personal shite] It’s another one hour powerblog from easyEverything. Tom from Barbelith links to me! Yes I sometimes do this in the easyEverything from TCR… it’s close to GOSH!, Forbidden Planet and it’s on my way home from work… Thanks for the Link, Tom.
March 15, 2000
[lastminute] Steve Bell on lastminute.com.
March 14, 2000
The OED goes online. The Oxford English Dictionary took seventy years to complete. The fascinating story behind it’s creation can be found in the book The Professor and the Madman. Here’s a link to the OED’s page on it’s history.