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June 27, 2006
[comics] John Byrne and his Forum discuss Lost Girls … Byrne: ‘This thread is officially too depressing. That there are people who would defend Moore on any grounds just adds to my overall sense of having wasted 30 years of my life. End of thread.’
[comics] Metafilter on Lost Girls‘So is this really a viable business model? Take a children’s classic, toss in some pornography, generate some canned controversy and then PROFIT!? I’ll be watching closely to see how much Moore rakes in on this. If this works then I can finally start shopping around my The Secret Life of Tiggers.’
June 25, 2006
[comics] Rich Johnson Reviews Lost Girls: ‘This comic has driven me to complex thought, to patterns and ideas staying fixed in my own mental space that will stay with me. I will quote this book in conversation, I know it. I will see others through it, I will filter experience through it, it has affected me as much as any fiction can.’
[comics] Rich Johnson on Lost Girls: ‘But I can’t see this being published, with Alan Moore’s current media profile, with the characters of Alice, Dorothy and Wendy used in this was (not to mention the coincidental Harold Potter) without someone kicking off. Am I the only one who can see “PEDO PAN” as a front-page headline of the News Of The World? I’ve already been asked for comment by the BBC which is planning a news feature in a couple of weeks.’
June 24, 2006
[comics] Alan Moore’s Erotic Lost Girls — some pages from Alan Moore and Melinda Gebbie’s Lost Girls [NSFW].
June 23, 2006
[comics] Hospital worry at “porn” take on Peter Pan’s Wendy — Reuters on Lost Girls‘Moore insists on calling the work “pornography”, while Publishers Weekly, in an article earlier this year, said it involved “fetishism, incest and even a touch of bestiality, as well as a whole lot of sexual activity involving minors”. It is due to be published in the United States in August.’
[comics] ‘Sex acts’ Wendy is Panned — CNN on Great Ormand Street and Lost Girls‘Stephen Cox, the hospital’s spokesman, said in a telephone interview Friday that it has not taken legal action against Moore and is was waiting to see whether the author will contact the institution to discuss its objections.’
[comics] Comic row over graphic Peter Pan — Great Ormond Street Hospital isn’t happy Alan Moore sexing up Peter Pan’s friend Wendy … ‘The Lost Girls, which shows Wendy in erotic trysts and being observed by paedophiles, is the latest work by Alan Moore, the British graphic novelist behind V for Vendetta. He said that his novel was inspired by Peter Pan but he would not seek permission to use the Wendy character. “I don’t see that you can ban anything in this day and age,” he said.’
May 3, 2006
[comics] Alan Moore Quotes: ‘Life isn’t divided into genres. It’s a horrifying, romantic, tragic, comical, science-fiction cowboy detective novel. You know, with a bit of pornography if you’re lucky.’
April 22, 2006
[comics] This Vicious Cabaret — an MP3 of David J. performing a song taken from Alan Moore’s V for Vendetta. (from Hidden City)
April 10, 2006
[comics] Black Legacy — an old Dr Who short-story written by Alan Moore involving the Cybermen … ‘Theta Troop are all dead!’ ‘Oh.’
April 8, 2006
[comics] Script Robot Alan Moore — in the begininning Alan Moore was just one of Tharg’s humble Script Robots…
March 19, 2006
[comics] Long Alan Moore Interview by Heidi McDonald [Part 1| Part 2] … ‘I wouldn’t like to claim I was being prescient but that said, it is pretty clear that I have a direct line to God and I know every moment of the future before it happens. [laughter]’
March 18, 2006
[comics] The Vendetta Behind ‘V for Vendetta’ — another article on Vendetta and Alan Moore from the NYT … ‘[Moore] resides in the sort of home that every gothic adolescent dreams of, one furnished with a library of rare books, antique gold-adorned wands and a painting of the mystical Enochian tables used by Dr. John Dee, the court astrologer of Queen Elizabeth I. He shuns comic-book conventions, never travels outside England and is a firm believer in magic as a “science of consciousness.” “I am what Harry Potter grew up into,” he said, “and it’s not a pretty sight.” Actually, he more closely resembles the boy-wizard’s half-giant friend Hagrid…’ [via BeaucoupKevin]
[comics] D for Vendetta — Wired News Review … ‘From the start, Larry and Andy Wachowski, the Matrix brothers, pack Vendetta with literary, religious, political and pop culture references: the Sex Pistols and The Girl From Ipanema, The Count of Monte Cristo and Beethoven, Twelfth Night and Benny Hill.’
March 17, 2006
[comics] Jonathan Ross reviews V for Vendetta: ‘Despite postponing the release date from last November to allow more time for post-production work, the film looks cheap and lacks any sense of time or place. Throw in Matrix veteran James McTeigue’s flat direction and you have a woeful, depressing failure. If it had been called V for Vasectomy I could scarcely have found it a less enjoyable experience…’ [via Haddock]
March 9, 2006
[comics] Alan Moore interview available on BBC2 Website — basically a “beginners interview” with Alan Moore but worth watching.
[comics] Reminder: Alan Moore Interview on BBC2 Tonight at 7.00pm — According to the Alan Moore Fan Site Jonathan Ross and Iain Sinclair are to make contributions…
March 3, 2006
[comics] Alan Moore to be interviewed on the BBC2’s Culture Show next Week — Thursday 9th March at 7:00pm … ‘A rare TV interview with Alan Moore, the unsung genius of British writers, and acclaimed author of the graphic novels V for Vendetta and Watchmen’ [thanks Graybo]
November 16, 2005
[comics] The Killing Joke Script — the first 40 pages from Alan Moore’s script … ‘As far as the characters themselves go, I’ll describe them in detail when they make their appearances, but my only general note would be that like the landscape and the various props, they have a sort of timeless and mythic quality to them which doesn’t fix them firmly in any one age-range or time-period. The Joker looks either old or badly depraved, but then he’s always looked that way. The Batman is big and grim and older than we are, because as I remember the Batman he’s always been bigger and older than I am and I’ll fight any man that says different.’
November 10, 2005
[comics] Alan Moore on Terrorism, America and Britain: ‘…You have to remember that over here there were teenagers being taken out of cellar bars in separate carrier bags all through the ’70s and ’80s because of the war in Northern Ireland. In that case, the IRA were largely being supported by donations from America. That was why I was a bit worried when George Bush said he was going to attack people who supported terrorism, I thought, oh my god, Chicago is going to be declared a rogue state and they’ll hunt down Teddy Kennedy.’
October 31, 2005
[comics] Dourdevil: Grit! — Alan Moore and Mike Collins spoof Frank Miller’s Daredevil Run …

image of dourdevil and erektra

September 13, 2005
[comics] Excerpts from Alan Moore’s script for Big Numbers #3‘PAGE 5, PANEL 1. Okay, now there are twelve panels on this page, with this first tier being a continuous background shot. I should point out before we get too far in that this page requires some technical information and possibly some visual reference that will have to wait until I can contact the guy I know who works in a Computer Shop.’
August 29, 2005
[comics] Excerpts from Alan Moore’s Watchmen Script … in PDF Format.

image of Rorschach's voice-over from Alan Moore's Watchmen Script

August 26, 2005
[comics] Governments should be Afraid of their People — Metafiler discuss V For Vendetta.
August 10, 2005
[comics] V for Vendetta Annotations — includes an interesting list of pop culture influences which Alan Moore and David Lloyd drew on whilst creating V for Vendetta

‘Orwell. Huxley. Thomas Disch. Judge Dredd. Harlan Ellison’s “Repent Harlequin! Said the Ticktockman.”, “Catman” and “Prowler in the City at the Edge of the World” by the same author. Vincent Price’s Dr. Phibes and Theatre of Blood. David Bowie. The Shadow. Nightraven. Batman. Farenheit 451. The writings of the New Worlds school of science fiction. Max Ernst’s painting “Europe After the Rains.” Thomas Pynchon. The atmosphere of British Second World War films. The Prisoner. Robin Hood. Dick Turpin…’

August 9, 2005
[comics] Two scanned pages [Page 1 | Page 2] from Alan Moore’s Script for V For Vendetta

image of voice of fate dialogue from Alan Moore's V for Vendetta Script

July 28, 2005
[movies] V for Vendetta Trailer — it doesn’t look as bad as League of Extraordinary Gentlemen… Alan Moore on the V for Vendetta Shooting Script: ‘They don’t know what British people have for breakfast, they couldn’t be bothered. ‘Eggy in a basket’ apparently. Now the US have ‘eggs in a basket,’ which is fried bread with a fried egg in a hole in the middle. I guess they thought we must eat that as well, and thought ‘eggy in a basket’ was a quaint and Olde Worlde version.’ [via Pete’s Linklog]
July 11, 2005
[moore] Old Gangsters Never Die — another song from Alan Moore produced around the same time as the The March of the Sinister Ducks.
June 13, 2005
[comics] The Mindscape of Alan Moore Trailer‘I believe that our culture is turning to steam.’ [via Alan Moore Fan Site]
May 21, 2005
[film] Watchmen – Will we be watching it after all in 2006? — Filmrot on the problem of bringing Moore and Gibbon’s Watchmen to the screen … ‘Unlike Alan Moore’s other notable ‘superhero’ comic The Extraordinary League of Gentlemen, Watchmen is not a romp. It is rich in the superhero tradition and has a sense of humour that happily makes fun of the genre but just as the iconic cover image is a smiley face, it is a smiley face with the blood of a hero smeared across it.’ [thanks Stuart]
May 16, 2005
[comics] Comics Recommended by Alan Moore … On Marshal Law: ‘If Watchmen did in any way kill off the superhero – which is a dubious proposition – then Marshal Law has taken it further with this wonderful act of necrophilia, where it has degraded the corpse in a really amusing way.’
February 8, 2005
[comics] The Craft — yet another Alan Moore interview … ‘We obviously have, as a species, a number of problems at this current time. The only way I can see for us to get round them is thinking our way round them — I can’t see us spending our way round them, we’re not going to be able to bomb our way around them. I could be wrong, maybe we can spend and bomb our way around them, but I would say on balance that if we’re gonna get round them at all, we’re gonna have to think our way around them, and that is gonna need new forms of thinking. I don’t know what they are, but I’d just say let’s try some of the options, and see if anything interesting comes up.’
February 6, 2005
[comics] The Sinister Ducks — a flash animation of the song by Alan Moore … ‘What are they doing at night in the park? Ducks, Ducks! Quack, Quack! Quack, Quack! Think of them waddling about in the dark. Ducks, Ducks! Quack, Quack! Quack, Quack! Sneering and whispering and stealing your cars, Reading pornography, smoking cigars. Ducks, Ducks! Quack, Quack! Quack, Quack!’ [Previously: March of the Sinister Ducks – MP3 Download]
January 28, 2005
[comics] Stewart Lee interviews Alan Moore — on Radio 4’s Chain Reaction‘For the working classes British comics were just something you had like Rickets…’ [Update: Alan Moore “Chain Reaction” Interview Transcript … On Swamp Thing: ‘The whole thing that the book hinged upon was there was this tragic individual who is basically like Hamlet covered in snot. (audience laughs) He just walks around feeling sorry for himself. That’s understandable, I mean I would too…’]
September 16, 2004
[comics] Neil Gaiman, Grant Morrison and Alan Moore… as Lego. [via Neil Gaiman’s Journal]
August 16, 2004
[comics] Something Awful Photoshops Watchmen


‘…the harrowing specter of sexual dysfunction.’

August 5, 2004
[comics] V for Vendetta Annotations — includes an interesting list of pop culture influences which Alan Moore and David Lloyd drew on whilst creating V for Vendetta [Related: More Moore Annotations]…

‘Orwell. Huxley. Thomas Disch. Judge Dredd. Harlan Ellison’s “Repent Harlequin! Said the Ticktockman.”, “Catman” and “Prowler in the City at the Edge of the World” by the same author. Vincent Price’s Dr. Phibes and Theatre of Blood. David Bowie. The Shadow. Nightraven. Batman. Farenheit 451. The writings of the New Worlds school of science fiction. Max Ernst’s painting “Europe After the Rains.” Thomas Pynchon. The atmosphere of British Second World War films. The Prisoner. Robin Hood. Dick Turpin…’

July 25, 2004
[comics] ‘Watchmen’ unmasked for Par, Aronofsky — details from Hollywoodreporter.com … ‘”Watchmen,” the seminal DC Comics limited series, has landed at Paramount Pictures. Darren Aronofsky will develop and direct the project, which is being written by David Hayter.’
March 22, 2004
[comics] Alan Moore’s memorial for Julie Schwartz: ‘And now we hear that Julie has been… discontinued? Cancelled? But they said the same about Green Lantern and the Flash back in the early ‘fifties, so we can’t be certain. This is comics. There’ll be some way around it, be some parallel world Earth-Four Julie, born thirty years later to account for problems in the continuity, and decked out in a jazzier, more streamlined outfit.’ [via Neilalien]
March 18, 2004
[comics] The Reluctant Hero — another interview with Alan Moore‘Put together by Paul Gravett, an internationally renowned expert on comic-book art (he also curated last year’s Comica festival at the ICA), the exhibition features a mass of original, rare or never-seen-before art created for Alan Moore works over the last 25 years, as well as previewing The Mindscape of Alan Moore, an 80-minute documentary on the writer. “It’s an enormous honour,” Moore says of the show. “Even if it makes me feel like I’m almost dead.”‘
March 14, 2004
[comics] John Byrne on Grant Morrison and Alan Moore: ‘I get no sense from [Grant] Morrison’s work that he has any “love for the genre”. I get the same vibe I get from [Alan] Moore — a cold and calculated mixing of ingredients the writer knows the fans like, but to which the writer himself has no eviceral connection. Nostalgia without being nostalgic, as I have dubbed it.’ [via ADD]
March 12, 2004
[comics] 5 Questions for Alan Moore — another Q&A from ADD Blog… Moore on Writing Voice Of the Fire: ‘As it happened, quite eerily, there were a number of events that more than satisfied the various things that I needed to finish the novel satisfyingly, you know, things like severed heads and big black dogs, often in conjunction with each other. So, it was very eerie at times, not just surprising, but incredibly eerie. There are moments during a writer’s life, especially if he or she is dealing with something very close to home, if it’s getting a bit self-referential, that sometimes the borderlines between fiction and your actual reality can get dangerously blurred and, yeah, that happened more than once during the course of Voice Of The Fire.’
January 21, 2004
[comics] Sinister Ducks – March of the Sinister Ducks (MP3 File Download) — a song by Alan Moore and his band The Sinister Ducks from 1983 … ‘What are they doing at night in the park? Ducks, Ducks! Quack, Quack! Quack, Quack! Think of them waddling about in the dark. Ducks, Ducks! Quack, Quack! Quack, Quack! Sneering and whispering and stealing your cars, Reading pornography, smoking cigars. Ducks, Ducks! Quack, Quack! Quack, Quack!’ [via Scaryduck and Neil Gaiman]
January 6, 2004
[comics] Alan Moore vs. Grant T. Morrison‘An Epic Bare-Knuckle Brawl Between Two Mega-Legends’ [via plasticbag.org]
November 18, 2003
[comics] Alan Moore is 50. Happy Birthday… and enjoy your retirement!

‘Sat in a sandwich bar in Westminster I meet the sharp south-London wideboy occultist that I’d created some years previously for a U.S. comic book. He looks at me. He nods, and smiles, and walks away. Years later, in another place, he steps out from the dark and speaks to me. He whispers: I’ll tell you the ultimate secret of Magic. Any cunt can do it.’ [link]

‘The basic thing to remember is that, eventually, I am always right’ [link]

‘Dog carcass in alley this morning, tire tread on burst stomach. This city is afraid of me. I have seen it’s true face. The streets are extended gutters and the gutters are full of blood and when the drains finally scab over, all the vermin will drown. The accumulated filth of all their sex and murder will foam up about their waists and all the whores and politicians will look up and shout “Save us!”… and I’ll look down and whisper, “No.” They had a choice, all of them. They could have followed in the footsteps of good men like my father, or President Truman. Decent men who believed in a days work for a days pay. Instead they followed the droppings of lechers and communists and didn’t realize that the trail led over a precipice until it was too late. Don’t tell me they didn’t have a choice. Now the whole world stands on the brink, staring down into bloody hell, all those liberals and intellectuals and smooth-talkers… and all of a sudden, nobody can think of anything to say.’ [link]

‘…with the world political situation as it is at the moment the political radical is put in a difficult position because, hum, how do you rebel against chaos? You know, much as political conspiracy theorists would like to think otherwise, the brutal truth of the thing is nobody’s in control, this is a runaway train. Nobody’s in control, there’s not some big conspiracy in control, whether it’s Jewish bankers or nazis or CIA spooks, the simple truth is that the world is a complex storm of mathematics, basically… Very complicated mathematics that is beyond human comprehension.’ [link]

‘I made it all up, and it all came true anyway. That’s the funny part.’ [link]

September 28, 2003
[comics] Studio sued over superhero movie — 20th Century Fox sued for stealing the idea for The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen from two Hollywood insiders. ‘…the lawsuit alleges that Mr Cohen and Mr Poll pitched the idea to Fox several times between 1993 and 1996, under the name the Cast of Characters. It goes on to allege that Fox commissioned Mr Moore to create the comic book as “smokescreen” for poaching the idea, and cutting the pair out of the production.’
September 1, 2003
[comics] Gallery of Pages from Big Numbers #3 — pages from Moore and Sienkiewicz’s unpublished graphic novel …

panels from Big Numbers 3


Related: Alan Moore discusses the plot to Big Numbers. [Part One] [Part Two] … ‘The mall is going to change everything, everything will continue to change, but now CHRISTINE has got a handle on it, she’s been through all of these mad events, she’s had this illusory love affair, she’s seen what’s happened to her sister and dad, her mother, sort of, all of this stuff and it’s been a lesson and she’s got the metaphor to hang it all on this past thing so she goes off to write Big Numbers basically, she goes off to write a book about chaos and small towns. And that’s her story. ‘
August 1, 2003
[comics] Teaser Art from League of Extraordinary Gentlemen Vol. Three … Comments from Kevin O’Neill: ‘… the third volume will jump to the year 1920 and will feature new League members, although Mina will still be around. “We’ll also go back and jump forward as well, around the 1950s,” O’Neill said. “Alan has some dazzling ideas. It’s going to be sexier than earlier volumes.” O’Neill said there will be a break between the second and third volumes. “Alan’s promised to continue with the League,” O’Neill said.’ [Related: League of Extraordinary Gentlemen Annotations | via Barbelith]
July 9, 2003
[comics] Give me Moore — another interview with Alan Moore‘”The basic thing to remember,” growls Alan Moore “is that, eventually, I am always right.” And Lord knows, nobody is going to argue with the man. Moore looks intimidating enough in the few photos he has allowed to be taken — “I don’t do smiles. If I’m not actually glaring, that’s pretty good”. But meeting him in the flesh is even more scary. He’s a towering giant : the hair really is that bushy, the elaborate rings on his fingers chink as he moves, and the joints piled neatly beside his chair really are over 10cm long.’ [via The Copydesk]